Sean Brightman is a

comedian with a website.

No diggedy.



What am i up to?

Fresh from the Edinburgh fringe festival, I'm now performing mainly new material in preparation of pulling together a new show. Eventually! You'll also find me curating and regularly hosting We Love Comedy, a pop up comedy shop bringing brilliant comedy to brilliant places. We are also bringing our ever-so-slightly acclaimed (by audience and critics!) Edinburgh show to the Kingston Comedy Festival, just because we can and love the characters dearly.
who am i?

A versatile comedian and curator of comedy, with love for the audience. A semi-finalist in 2010's So You Think You're Funny Competition. A shortlisted comedian in 2011 for the BBC New Comedy Awards. A finalist in the 2012 Piccadilly Comedy Club competition where Chortle reviewed him as "Happy", one of the more positive words used in that particular review. A regular performer and host of comedy shows all over. A hater of competitions, aside from spot the ball. A husband and three-legged dog owner.
what do people say?

"A Very Funny Man" 
Stephen K. Amos

"Brilliantly funny"
visitnorwich.co.uk

"A flair for observation"
VisitLondon.com

"A natural MC"

Paul Ricketts

"There were some stand-out performances including a reverse 
Aristocrats gag by Sean Brightman which was ace"

Tiernan Douieb
watch me here

Here are a few things to watch. Some old, some slightly newer.
say hello

Why not say hello? If you like what you see and would like to book me to host a show or perform a comedy set from five to fifty minutes, please get in touch. I can also help put together a bespoke comedy show to suit your needs. Just fill in the form below.
We Love Comedy


 
RAF Henlow Theatre
I'm starting to really enjoy the challenge of being the opening act. Especially at the lower end of the ladder, you don't always know what sort of start or thread you'll be given by the emcee so there seems to often be an added responsibility to help get the night off to the right foot. Last Friday (19th May), I travelled up to RAF Henlow with some very funny people to do a show at the lovely little theatre next to the RAF base (see picture). The show was an Edinburgh preview for TNT Comedy Explosion – an exciting looking variable bill extravaganza. When we arrived Nigel, the organiser and compere for the evening told me I was to be first on. Well, I almost bricked it so I did. Only kidding, well a slight amount of apprehension is always a good thing I think – personally I feed off this energy really well in a performance; it helping to keep my mind sensitive to the comic possibilities surrounding me. Having a wander around the theatre to start with really got a good buzz going, then as the not-quite-capacity crowd filed in, I tucked myself out of the way, stretched and did a few improv exercises to get ready. Nigey baby (as he's affectionately known) warmed the crowd nicely with some small-talk and and gave a friends son an unforgettable birthday present for his fifteenth birthday – a pack of three prophylactics. (I just like the word 'prophylactic'). This gave me something nice to play with at the start of my set. Hey, that didn't sound right! What I meant was, it gave me an idea to tell the lad to stick the condoms over an exhaust pipe, then hide and wait for the car to drive off – being an RAF base, it would probably start World War 3! This went down really well. Next I had some nice banter with the sole old lady sitting on the front row, before tucking into a few minutes of material. All in all a lovely experience and I hope I helped get the night off onto the right foot!
 
 
Last night at the Round Table, despite our best efforts flyering, cajoling and what can only be described as unashamed begging quite frankly, we didn't really have enough audience to do a proper show. Hell, the weather had been warm all day, the FA cup had just been on and the pub wasn't very full. What can you do? At 9pm, we decided to pull the gig and gave our potential mini-audience their money back. Because we had a very strong line-up, we asked everyone if they wanted to stay so we could have a play around and try out material. We had three live-wires in our audience of five (not including comedians), one of which wanted to banter with the comedians throughout. In a bigger room, this would have been a nightmare, but it turned into a night with an interesting dynamic. It helped make the interaction much more of a conversation and allowed you the flexibility and freedom to riff on certain elements of your existing material, in a much more relaxed environment. Now, I'm not saying you shouldn't pull a gig, just that sometimes you get the opportunity to make something good out of an almost hopeless looking comedy situation and when you do, it can make for a magic night. Or a hostage situation.